What Is Stylus?

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If you've ever tried to use your fingers to navigate the touchscreen on your phone, you know it takes work. That's where the stylus comes in. A stylus is a handheld device with touch screen input devices or graphics tablets to draw on the screen or interact with the operating system. It is an input device typically used with handheld computers such as mobile phones and tablets and computers that are used with a graphics tablet and a painting program. The stylus allows users to write or draw on their devices more precisely than possible using their fingers alone. The stylus has a long history. It was initially just a writing implement, but now it's used to tap away all those touch screens in your life. When touch screen technology was new, and the most common type of screen was the resistive touch screen which required pressure to register input, styli were plastic-tipped devices used to press the screen to register touch input. With capacitive screens now the norm for mobile devices, the stylus has evolved, and the tip currently consists of unique material that records with the screen. The stylus is one of the most popular input devices for mobile devices, but it's a lot more than just a drawing tool. It can also turn your tablet into a sketchpad and enhance your artistic skills. With a suitable stylus, drawing or painting on your computer feels as easy as pen and paper. If you're an artist who wants to take your work to the next level, a stylus that registers pressure sensitivity will help you create thinner or bolder strokes, depending on how hard you press down on it. You could also use one with customizable buttons for assigning specific tools and colors to each button, so you're always trying to find the right tool at the right time again!

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